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Low Hsien Meng
Low Hsien Meng

Assistant Principal Engineer, UAV business unit, Engineering Development Centre, ST Aerospace

Q: Tell us briefly about yourself and your work.

I graduated from NTU in 2013 after receiving formal education in Aerospace Engineering.

I am an Assistant Principal Engineer in the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) business unit of the Engineering Development Centre at ST Aerospace. I manage the technical aspects and execution of projects.

Q: What is the most interesting aspect of your involvement in the DroNet project?

DroNet is an end-to-end drone-agnostic operating system that is capable of integrating highly autonomous and multi-function networks of Unmanned Aerial Systems. There is nothing more interesting than being able to witness first-hand the development and coming together of all the various enabling components – the air, ground and network segments – to actualise our vision of the DroNet system.

Q: What do you enjoy most about your work?

Being able to work with a talented group of people with diverse disciplines and different backgrounds; all working together as a team because of our passion and shared vision in the project.  

 

"Communicate, interact and learn from everyone around you - there's plenty to learn and benefit from."
Low Hsien Meng, Assistant Principal Engineer, UAV business unit, Engineering Development Centre, ST Aerospace

Q: UAVs are swiftly becoming more commonplace and accepted by users. How do you envision modern life to be impacted by UAVs in 10 years’ time?

With the natural progression of most technologies, we will see an increase in safety, reliability, performance and useful features in UAVs as well as a drop in developmental and production cost over the next decade. This paves the way for even more new uses cases to be discovered, such that the use of UAVs in industries such as security, agriculture, transportation and delivery or logistics will become commonplace. Who knows, you might even be taking an autonomous vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft to work in 10 - 20 years’ time!

Q: What advice would you give to young engineers?

Communicate, interact and learn from everyone around you - there's plenty to learn and benefit from.